Winged Wednesday 5/20/2020

Eric Gofreed

Well-Known Member
A family illness will prevent me from responding to photos for a few days or longer. Today's winged Wednesday is the slaty flowerpiercer, Diglossa plumbea. Slaty flowerpiercers are endemic to the highlands of Costa Rica and Western Panama. Using their unique bill, Flowerpiercers pierce the base of the flower to reach the nectar, bypassing pollination for the plant. However, it does create an opening for small-billed hummingbirds to feed. To help Focal World bird photographers, this photo checks most of the boxes I want in bird photograph; great light, exquisite details, eye-level perspective, separation from the background, and a velvety background. Additionally, the distinctive bill designed for piercing the flower is obvious

Slaty flowerpiercer.jpg
 
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AlanLichty

Moderator
I have not done much bird photography since moving to Utah in 2011. I did go out a few weeks back to Utah Lake looking for Yellow Headed Blackbirds and finding none in view although I heard a few. I did find this sandpiper silhouetted against the sky.
That sure looks a lot like a Killdeer Ben. Neat birds and quite common in Utah.
 

Ben Egbert

Forum Helper
Staff member
You are right Alan, once more I got my birds mixed up, thanks for the correction. I am just as bad with peoples names :rolleyes:
 

Douglas Sherman

Supporting Member
A family illness will prevent me from responding to photos for a few days or longer. Today's winged Wednesday is the slaty flowerpiercer, Diglossa plumbea. Slaty flowerpiercers are endemic to the highlands of Costa Rica and Western Panama. Using their unique bill, Flowerpiercers pierce the base of the flower to reach the nectar, bypassing pollination for the plant. However, it does create an opening for small-billed hummingbirds to feed. To help Focal World bird photographers, this photo checks most of the boxes I want in bird photograph; great light, exquisite details, eye-level perspective, separation from the background, and a velvety background. Additionally, the distinctive bill designed for piercing the flower is obvious

View attachment 28642
Great image as usual, Eric. Not only can you see the bill but also the puncture mark at the base of the flower.
 

JimFox

Moderator
Staff member
Here is mine, it's from last Saturday along the California Coast. While shooting the Elephant seals I spotted this speck of black with what looked like a red head approaching from the south. Fortunately I had my 70-300mm on for some tighter shots of the seals. No time to switch to any bif settings, but I managed to grab about 6 shots of it. I am thinking it's a Vulture? But I have no real clue.

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