Winged Wednesday - 2019/08/14

Eric Gofreed

Well-Known Member

For the Seventh “Winged Wednesday,” I have selected photos of hummingbirds from my backyard. It is a treat to have the birds come to you. Multi-flash set up with 5 flashes, 4 on the hummingbird and 1 on the background. The flashes are set at 1/32 power giving a action stopping speed of @1/24,000 sec. The first photo is a female black-chinned hummingbird on Texas yellow yucca blossoms. The second is a female broad-tailed hummingbird. The third photo is a female Costa's hummingbird on desert willow.
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Broad-tailed Hummingbird-1134-Edit.jpg
Costa's Hummingbird-774-Edit.jpg
 

AlanLichty

Moderator
Its neat you have so many different kinds of hummers to watch. And a well set up venue to capture images of them like this. Very nice details in these captures.

We get almost entirely Anna's Hummingbirds around our house. Lots of them - we have almost continuous activity on our feeders but none of them were set up to offer a photogenic backdrop.
 

AlanLichty

Moderator
This shot is a testimony to the amazing things we can do with older DSLR images given our current generation of processing software. This is a 1:1 shot of a badly underexposed image of a young red-tail hawk in the Ridgefield Wildlife Refuge from a Canon D60 shot at ISO 400. I am amazed that I was able to get anything workable at all out the shot given the noise levels that were present when I brought the exposure up to usable levels.

 

JimFox

Moderator
Staff member
For the Seventh “Winged Wednesday,” I have selected photos of hummingbirds from my backyard. It is a treat to have the birds come to you. Multi-flash set up with 5 flashes, 4 on the hummingbird and 1 on the background. The flashes are set at 1/32 power giving a action stopping speed of @1/24,000 sec. The first photo is a female black-chinned hummingbird on Texas yellow yucca blossoms. The second is a female broad-tailed hummingbird. The third photo is a female Costa's hummingbird on desert willow. View attachment 20612

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Those are cool hummingbirds Eric! Thanks for starting this.
 

Eric Gofreed

Well-Known Member
This is a Purple Swamphen. It is a non-native species that escaped from captivity during Hurricane Andrew and has increased in numbers around Pembrooke Pines and Miami, Florida in the vicinity where they escaped captivity.. It is considered an invasive bird.

View attachment 20635
That is a handsome bird. I have photographed them by the hundreds in New Zealand. Awesome details and color, Doug
 

Douglas Sherman

Supporting Member
This one is from Doug's backyard. We had been relaxing a bit and then saw hummingbirds flying in. After shooting for a bit I saw a bee flying around and went for it.

View attachment 20627
Great job with this one, Jim. These guy are not easy to catch.
Thanks for starting this Eric. That second hummer is a unique view of the wings, but all are very nice.

Alan, nice recovery, I have a lot of old noise spoiled shots from back in the day.

Here is my winged entry for the week.

What a spectacular catch for you and the bird, Ben.
 

Jim Dockery

Well-Known Member
Great work on those hummers Eric, each is wonderful - the flash really works to freeze the action and you nailed the focus.
 
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