Winged Wednesday 11/20/2019

Eric Gofreed

Well-Known Member
I have two photos for today’s Winged Wednesday. The first photo is a White-line sphinx moth (Hyles lineata) and the second is a Water-Boatman. The White-lined sphinx moth hoovers over flowers much like a hummingbird earning the nick-name, Hummingbird moth.”

White-lined sphynx moth.jpg


The second photo is the common Water Boatman. Regrettably, his wings are not visible. The boatman was captured in my pond with a net, rinsed with distilled water a few times then placed in a wine glass with filtered distilled water for the photograph.

Boatman bugs make the jerking movements during swimming with their long, hairy and oar-like hind legs. This Boatman is up-side-down. Water Boatman are true bugs, they have long spiked mouth parts for puncturing and sucking prey. I don’t recommend handling these bugs because their bite is as painful as a bee sting.

Water Boatman.jpg
 

AlanLichty

Moderator
Beautiful shot of the sphinx moth with the wings stretched out for display. I can't say that I have ever spent any time studying insects like the boatman before so I learned something new this morning. Sounds like I should keep my distance if I should encounter one.
 

ckcarr

Founding Member
Boatman bugs make the jerking movements during swimming with their long, hairy and oar-like hind legs. This Boatman is up-side-down. Water Boatman are true bugs, they have long spiked mouth parts for puncturing and sucking prey. I don’t recommend handling these bugs because their bite is as painful as a bee sting.
I don't know where they came from, although I suspect the city water supply, but a couple years ago I found two of those boatman bugs in my pool right after filling it. When I scooped them out with the net and threw on the ground they were making very angry hissing noises. I didn't even know what they were until I looked them up.
 
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