Rebuilding a Home Office and Computing Area - Pt. 3

Discussion in 'Sit and Chat' started by AlanLichty, Feb 8, 2019.

  1. AlanLichty

    AlanLichty Moderator

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    Once the desktop glueup was finished I laminated the surface with Formica as a work surface. I then added a beveled front edge to the desktop made out of oak. I had encountered a beveled edge like this once on an early graphics display workstation from the mid 1970's that I always thought was a nice edge for a computing desk. I added a strip of oak at both ends for cosmetics. In this image the mortises have already been cut in the desktop surface where the upper pieces attach.

    MortisingDesktop.jpg

    Once the primary mill work was done I sanded everything to get rid of the pencil lines I used for the layout work and clean up the surfaces. As I worked on all of the pieces I kept the panels for each separate module in piles with a printout of each module showing the numbered parts.

    InitialSanding.jpg

    This made it time for the moment of truth - does this stuff really fit together? I took on the task using mostly the tenons and some of the connector assemblies to test it all out:

    DryAssembly.jpg

    It was a big relief to actually see all of this stuff fit together after several weeks of prep work. This opened the door to finish the pieces. I used a very light cut of Super Blonde Shellac to seal the wood and then followed with semi gloss water borne urethane. It's hard to find enough flat spaces to finish all of the panels.

    Finishing.jpg

    Once the panels were done I used the same finishing techniques for the desktop:

    Desktop.jpg

    Once the finishing work was done I started the task of dismantling my old office space and prepping the room for the new desk.

    The next installment will cover the results.
     
    Bill Swartzwelder likes this.
  2. Ben Egbert

    Ben Egbert Forum Helper
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    Nice wither project and it will be beautiful and unique when done. Something to be very proud of.
     
  3. Bill Swartzwelder

    Bill Swartzwelder Well-Known Member

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    Nice design I like the tapered front on the desktop... I also use a combination of base coat shellac to seal my wood before spraying Minwax Polycrylic... It sprays very nicely straight out of the can in my Automotive HVLP gun. Shellac keeps the water based finish from raising the grain. You do very nice work and keep your workspace well organized. Nice!
     
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  4. AlanLichty

    AlanLichty Moderator

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    Thanks - as I mentioned in the thread I didn't come up with the beveled edge design. Someone back in the early to mid 70's came up with it for an early graphic workstation called an Imlac PDS-1. When I first started working with computers at the University of Utah in the late 70's we had one of these that was still functioning connected to our DEC-20/60. When it died the university property management folks didn't know what to do with it so they lets us part it out for keepsakes. I scored the tabletop with the beveled edge and one of the core memory cards. I still have the tabletop although it's too small for any of my work areas but I always loved the beveled lip so I replicated it for this desktop. I am delighted to have it back - very easy on the wrists. It does take up space but I have plenty of that in my office but I never understood why no one else came up with this for ergonomics at a computer workspace.

    I worked for a couple of years in the finishing room of a Wurlitzer piano factory in Logan Utah while I was an undergraduate and got used to how to finish wood in a lot of different ways. We used to use a sealer sander coat to raise the grain followed by a scuff sand before the lacquer coats. For my own work now I like a really light cut of shellac (I make my own using a combination of Super Blonde and Blonde shellac flakes) as a sealer coat and follow that with a 220 grit sanding and then 320 grit sanding between the urethane coats.
     
  5. JimFox

    JimFox Moderator
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    Very cool Alan! I am enjoying spacing out reading these so that I can spread this out.

    I also like that front edge, good choice. And yeah, that is a lot of wood! Wow, it's amazing to see all those pieces.
     
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