Rebuilding a Home Office and Computing Area - Pt. 2

Discussion in 'Sit and Chat' started by AlanLichty, Feb 8, 2019.

  1. AlanLichty

    AlanLichty Moderator

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    This is the second installment for my new office desk system.

    The SketchUp CAD program also allows me to make copies of each of the panels and lay them out for cutting up 4'x8' panels:

    CutList.jpg

    The material in this case is 3/4" Maple plywood. I ended up using 6 sheets of plywood which at 80 lbs./sheet leaves this desk assembly somewhere around 450-500 lbs. It's 7' tall so the only practical way to build this is using knockdown connectors so it can be assembled in place. I used a joinery tool called a Domino to create the necessary mortises and connector mill work.

    Task 1 was to break down the plywood sheets so I made printouts of each sheet and used them for notes while I prepped the parts.

    CutDiagram.jpg

    I numbered all of the parts as they were cut so I could keep track of everything. I broke the desk system into 5 parts - the base, the desktop, the shelf system on top of the desk on the right, the top cupboard span, and the small bookcase on the right. Between all of the panels and the cross bracing there are 45 pieces in the assembly with 80 Domino break down connectors and somewhere around 180-200 Domino floating tenon joints. Each plywood panel edge was glued to an edge band of western maple on the face that shows when assembled. This is a set of shelves ready for edge banding with the solid edge pieces on the left.

    EdgeBanding.jpg

    Once all of the panels had the edge banding applied I could start the task of laying out all the necessary mill work - determining which faces were going to be showing and then where shelf holes would need to be.

    Millwork.jpg

    Finally, I glued up the pieces to make a desktop. the desktop is 102" long so I laminated 2 pieces of 3/4" hardwood plywood and with extensions on each end to get the desired length. I added 2" of oak on the front along with a laminated beam as a front edge. These are the parts for the desktop as milled.

    DesktopComponents.jpg

    Part 3 will take the mill work process through dry assembly and finishing.
     
    Bill Swartzwelder likes this.
  2. Ben Egbert

    Ben Egbert Forum Helper
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    Neat Alan, and again the attachments return error.
     
  3. AlanLichty

    AlanLichty Moderator

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    Fixed now.
     
  4. JimFox

    JimFox Moderator
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    Hey Alan. This is pretty cool.

    I hope you don't mind, but I am just eye balling it, and it looks like there would be a wasted 4x8 in the end? The long one from the bottom could have been cut out of #2 from the left. The bottom board could have been cut from #4 from the left at the bottom, and moving that small bottom from #4 over to #1 while moving that small lower right piece in #1 to #3. At least it looks like that from here. But then you mentioned you actually used 6 - 4x8's? Hopefully that makes some sense, or I might have made you dizzy... :rolleyes:

    How did you drill the shelf holes? Do you have a rig set up I would think?
     
  5. AlanLichty

    AlanLichty Moderator

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    The drawings didn't show the shelves for the cupboard areas (8 of them) that are 23 1/2" x 16". I hardly have any of the plywood left after I cut 6 of those out. I will need at least one more sheet to make all of the shelves I'd like to add. I juggled the parts around quite a few times to maximize what I get out of each sheet but usually like to have at least some wood left over after each project to use for jigs and small ad hoc projects. If I had the space I'd love to be able to have extra 4x8 sheets on hand but I have no way to store full sheets. I go through a lot of maple plywood with various cabinets and things I make.

    I have a jig that lets me use a plunge router to make the shelf holes. I use a 5mm downcut spiral bit for this task since it leaves almost perfectly clean edges on the holes. Once I have the jig aligned and clamped down I can drill out a line of holes like you see in image #4 in in about a minute.
     
  6. Bill Swartzwelder

    Bill Swartzwelder Well-Known Member

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    <subscribe> Nice work... Woodworking is one of my other hobbies... I have a full array of woodworking tools with a central dust collection set up, access to a band sawmill and I have a solar kiln in my backyard, with a 10x10 lumber storage building stuffed full of various hardwoods. Love the detail you went to in showing your sketchup drawings. I need to make a new desk at some point... I will be watching this thread with great interest.

    Edit... just realized there were more parts to this build already posted.
     
    #6 Bill Swartzwelder, Feb 10, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
    AlanLichty likes this.

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